Traditional recipes

McDonald's CEO Claims 'We Don't Sell Junk Food'

McDonald's CEO Claims 'We Don't Sell Junk Food'


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

A 9-year-old asked why Thompson wasn't serving healthier food. Here's his response

Last week when an adorable 9-year-old spoke up to McDonald's CEO Don Thompson about healthy eating, the media world went aflutter about the precocious girl's questions. But of course, the response is even more interesting.

"I don't think [it's] fair when big companies try to [talk]kids into eating foods that isn't good for them by using toys and cartoons characters," the girl said, according to a transcript.

"I made cooking videos with my mom that showcase that eating healthy can be fine and yummy... Mr. Thompson don't you want to kids to be healthy so they can live a happy life?" she later added.

His response? Thompson points out that McDonald's is focusing on being healthier (despite having one of the unhealthiest kids' meals out there) and claims their food isn't junk food.

"We don't sell junk food Hannah," he said. "My kids also [ate] McDonald’s, when they were about your size... We serve a lot of foods and veggies at McDonald’s and are trying to sell even more with the apples that we introduced into the Happy Meal."

He also notes that they're working on introducing kiwis, pineapples, and more in salads, while they've swapped in fat-free milk and vegetables. But still, let's all admit that a cheeseburger isn't the same as a turkey sandwich.


Don Thompson, McDonald's CEO, Feeds His Kids Burgers, Fries, Vegetables

At a shareholder meeting this past May, a nine-year-old asked McDonald's CEO Don Thompson to stop "trying to trick kids into wanting to eat your food all the time." Thompson's response? "We don't sell junk food." He continued, saying that McDonald's sells a lot of fruits and vegetables and is trying to sell even more.

On Wednesday, host Betty Liu of Bloomberg TV's "In The Loop" sat down for an interview with Thompson. They discussed a range of topics from worker exploitation to menu changes.

"We have tremendously high quality proteins," he says. "It is all real food," he continues. "We have always supported high quality food. We support farmers, fresh food."

Liu brings up kids' food at McDonald's and Thompson responds, "We've added more fruits, more vegetables, we've changed our milks. we've done a lot of things." He also reaffirms that the company will "continue to try to do more."

Thompson gets defensive though, when it comes to marketing to children. People blame Ronald McDonald for peddling food to children, he claims, but argues that the blame is misguided. Ronald is merely a brand icon that is involved with the company's charities, he explains. "When is the last time you saw Ronald eating food or marketing to your children? You haven't seen Ronald do that," he says.

The CEO gets more personal when he discusses his own children. "I bring my kids to McDonald's now because the food is high-quality. It's safe." Thompson explains his philosophy:

"If my kids want to have fries, you know what, I'm gonna let my kids have fries, If they are active and if they're moving, there's nothing wrong with having some fries. Burgers and fries are an American staple. On the same token, my kids eat vegetables and they always have eaten vegetables. They didn't have a choice but to eat vegetables."

Burgers, fries and vegetables. Okay, then.

Watch the interview above (scroll to the 1:09 minute mark for the discussion about the menu and feeding children).


Top 10 Lies Told by McDonald's CEO at Annual Shareholder's Meeting

Last week at McDonald's annual shareholder's meeting, CEO Don Thompson got caught off-guard when a team of 15 advocates, led by Corporate Accountability International, descended upon corporate headquarters to question the fast food leader's relentless exploitation of children and communities of color.

Here are the top 10 lies Don Thompson told during the Q&A session:

In response to 9-year-old Hannah Robertson (read her statement):

1) "First off, we don't sell junk food, Hannah."

Where to even begin? A quick look at the menu belies that statement, while this "big breakfast" item packs more than 1,000 calories, half a day's worth.

Thompson tried this spin more than once:

2) "We sell lots of fruits and veggies at McDonald's and we sell side salads for a dollar on dollar menu."

In 2011, McDonald's made a big deal about how it would automatically include apple slices in Happy Meals. Considering that McDonald's is now the single largest purchaser of apples in the nation, that may qualify as "lots of fruit." Then again, the company is also the single largest purchaser of both beef (a billion pounds a year) and potatoes. I suppose Thompson would count fries as a vegetable?

While it's true McDonald's sells a side salad on its dollar menu (one of 13 items), if you only have a $1 to spend, what's the likelihood you would choose a small salad over the 310-calorie "grilled onion cheddar burger"?

3) Claiming "chicken nugget Happy Meals and fat-free milk" are healthy.

According to the McDonald's website, Chicken McNuggets contain roughly 30 ingredients, including: sodium phosphates, sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, monocalcium phosphate, and calcium lactate.

The "fat-free milk" Thompson touted numerous times is actually chocolate milk,containing 10 grams of added sugar, which as registered dietitian Andy Bellatti told me, is more than 75 percent of a day's worth for children ages 4 to 8 (per the American Heart Association guidelines). He added: "As it is, American children are consuming an exorbitant amount of sugar no one should be encouraging sugary beverages simply because they contain calcium and vitamin D."

Next, in response to a question from Corporate Accountability International about how McDonald's is getting kicked out of hospitals over obvious concerns about the conflicting messages, Thompson claimed:

4) "Many hospitals have asked us to come back in or to never leave."

Thompson must be forgetting about how the CEO of Truman Medical Center in Kansas City kicked McDonald's out just last year, citing an "inconsistent message." Perhaps Thompson was also unaware of at least three other hospitals that had ended their contracts with McDonald's prior to Truman: Lurie Children's Hospital (formerly Chicago Memorial Hospital), Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Vanderbilt Medical Center, and Parkland Health & Hospital System.

Continuing the health care theme was a powerful statement by pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Andrew Bremer, who called out the CEO for the company's marketing to children: "Last year you said, and I quote: 'Do me the honor. of not associating us with doing something that is damaging to children.' Well with all due respect, Mr. Thompson, your corporation is doing just that."

In his response, Thompson seemed to be getting a little desperate, sidestepping the issue of marketing to children altogether, claiming:

5) "We provide high-quality food, we always have. It's real beef, it's real chicken, it's real tomatoes, real lettuce, real fruit, real smoothies, real dairy, real eggs."

Really? The "real eggs" in an Egg McMuffin are "prepared with" the following:

Liquid Margarine: Liquid Soybean Oil and Hydrogenated Cottonseed and Soybean Oils, Water, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Soy Lecithin, Mono and Diglycerides, Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate (Preservatives), Artificial Flavor, Citric Acid, Vitamin A Palmitate, Beta Carotene (Color).

Even the "real smoothies" contain unpronounceable additives. See, for example, the "fruit base" of the McCafe Mango Pineapple Smoothie, which consists of:

Water, Clarified Demineralized Pineapple Juice Concentrate, Mango Puree Concentrate, Pineapple Juice Concentrate, Orange Juice Concentrate, Pineapple Puree, Passion Fruit Juice, Apple Juice Concentrate, Natural (Botanical Source) and Artificial Flavors, Contains less than 1% of the following: Peach Puree, Cellulose Powder, Pear Juice Concentrate, Xanthan Gum, Peach Juice Concentrate, Pectin, Citric Acid, Colored with Fruit and Vegetable Juice and Turmeric Extract, Ascorbic Acid (Preservative).

Not to mention the 47 grams of sugar. But I am sure it's "real sugar" -- right, Mr. Thompson?

Next, continuing to pound Thompson on marketing to kids was Kia Robertson (parent of Hannah, see Kia's statement here). Then the CEO trotted out the tired industry defense on exploiting children:

6) Globally, we follow guidelines on responsible marketing to children.

Parents in Brazil would beg to differ. Just last month, McDonald's was fined $1.6 million by the consumer protection agency in Sao Paolo for violating local laws on targeting children.

Here in the U.S., McDonald's is far from responsible. A report from Yale University found that McDonald's targets children as young as age 2 at Ronald.com. (This site now redirects to HappyMeal.com, where children are forewarned at the top of the page: "Hey kids, this is advertising!")

The Yale report also found: "Although McDonald's pledged to improve food marketing to children, they increased their volume of TV advertising from 2007 to 2009." Preschoolers saw 21 percent more McDonald's ads and older children viewed 26 percent more ads in 2009 compared to 2007. So much for guidelines.

Then Thompson actually said these words:

7) "And we are not marketing food to kids."

8) To further this point, he claimed "We are not marketing in schools."

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, see here, here, and here for Ronald McDonald visits to schools. Corporate Accountability International's report contains more examplesof school sightings of McDonald's clown ambassador. The company likes to claim, as CEO Thompson did, that Ronald is "just a clown" and that he doesn't actually hawk food per se, never mind the branding.

In more defensiveness (you almost had to feel sorry for him), CEO Thompson next tried this line:

9) We are not the cause of obesity.

Did he not see Supersize Me? Okay, McDonald's is obviously not the only cause of our nation's health woes, but research has shown a connection between the location of fast food outlets and adverse health outcomes in communities.

For example, one study found that nearly one-third of U.S. children ages 4 to 19 eat fast food, which increases the risk of obesity due to an increase in daily calories. Anotherstudy showed that students with fast food outlets near their schools were more likely to be overweight, and to consume more soda and less fruits and vegetables. And this connection was stronger for African-American children, while a third study found a similar pattern among low-income African-American adults. Speaking of which.

In response to Michelle Dyer (see her statement here), who challenged Thompson on McDonald's marketing to communities of color, the African-American CEO began by joking, "this hits kind of close to home, wonder why that is?" Then he got very defensive, claiming:

10) "We do not, have not, will not, try to target people of color. . I've been here 23 years. I know we don't do that and we wouldn't do that. We don't do that under my leadership."


10 most outlandish lies told by McDonald's CEO

By Michele Simon
Published May 31, 2013 5:54PM (UTC)

(AP/Richard Drew)

Shares

This article originally appeared on AlterNet.

Last week at McDonald’s annual shareholder’s meeting, CEO Don Thompson got caught off-guard when a team of 15 advocates, led by Corporate Accountability International, descended upon corporate headquarters to question the fast food leader’s relentless exploitation of children and communities of color.

Leading the way was Tanya Fields, executive director of the BLK ProjeK and mother of four. In her dramatic statement, Fields described her neighborhood in the Bronx as a “food swamp filled with corner stores and fast food,” noting that with three outlets within walking distance of her home, “McDonald’s happens to be the biggest alligator in that swamp.” She concluded: “Sorry, but four apple slices in plastic packaging won’t cut it.”

McDonald’s CEO Don Thompson’s response was to ignore Fields altogether and instead give the usual cheerleading speech about all the great things his company was doing. Then he took questions, and the fun really began.

Here are the top 10 lies told by Don Thompson during the Q&A session:

In response to 9-year-old Hannah Robertson (read her statement):

1) “First off, we don’t sell junk food, Hannah.”

Where to even begin? A quick look at the menu belies that statement, while this “big breakfast” item packs more than 1,000 calories: half a day’s worth.

Thompson tried this spin more than once:

2) “We sell lots of fruits and veggies at McDonald’s and we sell side salads for a dollar on the dollar menu.”

In 2011, McDonald’s made a big deal about how it would automatically include apple slices in Happy Meals. Considering that McDonald’s is now the single largest purchaser of apples in the nation, that may qualify as “lots of fruit.” Then again, the company is also the single largest purchaser of both beef (a billion pounds a year) and potatoes. I suppose Thompson would count fries as a vegetable?

While it’s true McDonald’s sells a side salad on its dollar menu (one of 13 items), if you only have a one dollar to spend, what’s the likelihood you would choose a small salad over the 310-calorie “grilled onion cheddar burger”?

3) Claiming “chicken nugget Happy Meals and fat-free milk” are healthy.

According to the McDonald’s website, Chicken McNuggets contain roughly 30 ingredients, including: sodium phosphates, sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, monocalcium phosphate and calcium lactate.

The “fat-free milk” Thompson touted numerous times is actually chocolate milk, containing 10 grams of added sugar, which as registered dietitian Andy Bellatti told me, is more than 75 percent of a day's worth for children ages 4-8 (per the American Heart Association’s guidelines). He added: “As it is, American children are consuming an exorbitant amount of sugar no one should be encouraging sugary beverages simply because they contain calcium and vitamin D.”

Next, in response to a question from Corporate Accountability International about how McDonald’s is getting kicked out of hospitals over obvious concerns about the conflicting messages, Thompson claimed:

4) “Many hospitals have asked us to come back in or to never leave.”

Thompson must be forgetting about how the CEO of Truman Medical Center in Kansas City kicked McDonald’s out just last year, citing an “inconsistent message.” Perhaps Thompson was also unaware of at least three other hospitals that had ended their contracts with McDonald’s prior to Truman: Lurie Children’s Hospital (formerly Chicago Memorial Hospital), Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Vanderbilt Medical Center and Parkland Health & Hospital System.

Also, Thompson must have missed this memo: more than 3,000 health professionals and institutions from around the world have signed a letter urging McDonald's to stop marketing junk food to children.

Continuing the healthcare theme was a powerful statement by pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Andrew Bremer, who called out the CEO for the company’s marketing to children: “Last year you said, and I quote: ‘Do me the honor… of not associating us with doing something that is damaging to children.’ Well with all due respect, Mr. Thompson, your corporation is doing just that.”

In his response, Thompson seemed to be getting a little desperate, sidestepping the issue of marketing to children altogether, claiming:

5) “We provide high-quality food, we always have. It’s real beef, it’s real chicken, it’s real tomatoes, real lettuce, real fruit, real smoothies, real dairy, real eggs.”

Really? The “real eggs” in an Egg McMuffin are “prepared with” the following:

Liquid Margarine: Liquid Soybean Oil and Hydrogenated Cottonseed and Soybean Oils, Water, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Soy Lecithin, Mono and Diglycerides, Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate (Preservatives), Artificial Flavor, Citric Acid, Vitamin A Palmitate, Beta Carotene (Color).

Even the “real smoothies” contain unpronounceable additives. See for example, the “fruit base” of the McCafe Mango Pineapple Smoothie, which consists of:

Water, Clarified Demineralized Pineapple Juice Concentrate, Mango Puree Concentrate, Pineapple Juice Concentrate, Orange Juice Concentrate, Pineapple Puree, Passion Fruit Juice, Apple Juice Concentrate, Natural (Botanical Source) and Artificial Flavors, Contains less than 1% of the following: Peach Puree, Cellulose Powder, Pear Juice Concentrate, Xanthan Gum, Peach Juice Concentrate, Pectin, Citric Acid, Colored with Fruit and Vegetable Juice and Turmeric Extract, Ascorbic Acid (Preservative).

But wait, there’s more. The Mango Pineapple Smoothie also contains “low fat smoothie yogurt,” consisting of: “Cultured Grade A Reduced Fat Milk, Sugar, Whey Protein Concentrate, Fructose, Corn Starch, Modified Food Starch, Gelatin, Active Yogurt Cultures.” And did I mention the 47 grams of sugar? But I am sure it’s “real sugar,” right Mr. Thompson?

Next, continuing to pound Thompson on marketing to kids was Kia Robertson (parent of Hannah see Kia’s statement here). Then the CEO trotted out the tired industry defense on exploiting children:

6) Globally, we follow guidelines on responsible marketing to children.

Parents in Brazil would beg to differ. Just last month, McDonald’s was fined $1.6 million by the consumer protection agency in Sao Paolo for violating local laws on targeting children.

Here in the U.S., McDonald’s is far from responsible. A report from Yale University found that McDonald’s targets children as young as age 2 at Ronald.com. (This site now redirects to HappyMeal.com, where children are forewarned at the top of the page: “Hey kids, this is advertising!”)

The Yale report also found: “Although McDonald's pledged to improve food marketing to children, they increased their volume of TV advertising from 2007 to 2009.” Preschoolers saw 21 percent more McDonald's ads and older children viewed 26 percent more ads in 2009 compared to 2007. So much for guidelines.

Then Thompson actually said these words:

7) “And we are not marketing food to kids.”

8) To further this point, he claimed “We are not marketing in schools.”

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, see here, here, and here for Ronald McDonald visits to schools. Corporate Accountability International’s report contains more examples of school sightings of McDonald’s clown ambassador. The company likes to claim, as CEO Thompson did, that Ronald is “just a clown” and that he doesn’t actually hawk food per se, never mind the branding.

McDonald’s also promotes “McTeacher’s Nights” in which, as the company describes it: “Educators, students, parents, and friends are invited to their local McDonald’s to ‘work’ and raise money for a designated school related cause.” Free labor plus free PR for McDonald’s, how brilliant is that?

In more defensiveness, (you almost had to feel sorry for him) CEO Thompson next tried this line:

9) We are not the cause of obesity.

Did he not see "Supersize Me"?

OK, McDonald’s is obviously not the only cause of our nation’s health woes, but research has shown a connection between the location of fast-food outlets and adverse health outcomes in communities.

For example, one study found that nearly one-third of U.S. children ages 4 to 19 eat fast food, which increases the risk of obesity due to an increase in daily calories. Another study showed that students with fast-food outlets near their schools were more likely to be overweight, and to consume more soda and fewer fruits and vegetables. And this connection was stronger for African-American children, while a third study found a similar pattern among low-income African-American adults. Speaking of which…

In response to Michelle Dyer (see her statement here), who challenged Thompson on McDonald’s marketing to communities of color, the African-American CEO began by joking, “this hits kind of close to home, wonder why that is?” Then he got very defensive, claiming:

10) “We do not, have not, will not, try to target people of color… I’ve been here 23 years. I know we don’t do that and we wouldn’t do that. We don’t do that under my leadership.”

These three McDonald’s websites speak for themselves:

According to this Bloomberg article, in 2011 McDonald’s CEO’s salary topped $8.75 million. For that kind of money, Don Thompson should have far better talking points at the ready. Let’s see what happens next year.

Meanwhile, you can take Corporate Accountability International’s action to tell CEO Don Thompson to stop marketing to children here.


Cop Grows Impatient, Draws Gun at Customers in McDonald's Drive Thru (VIDEO)

14-Year-Old Burger Doesn't Rot: Food is 'Fairly Dry' When Made, Says McDonald's (VIDEO)

Dead Giveaway: Hero Charles Ramsey Gets Autotuned and a Tweet From McDonald's

Charles Ramsey and McDonald's: Hero's Reward

McDonald's Employee Finds Her Stolen Car in Drive-Thru

Singer Sues McDonalds: Gospel Singer Claims Glass in Chicken Sandwich Ruined Her Vocal Chords

Fans Give Hero Charles Ramsey $14K Check 14 Restaurants Award Him Burgers for Life, But Not McDonald's


McDonald's CEO has claimed, "We don't sell junk food," at an annual shareholder's meeting last week.

CEO Don Thompson was confronted by a 9 year old fourth grader who questioned the nutritional value of McDonald's food and labeled its products "junk food."

Young Hannah Robertson began her statement by introducing herself and her age, and then continue to slam the nutritional value of McDonald's products as well as their advertising campaigns that target children.

She said, "It would be nice if you stopped trying to trick kids into wanting to eat your food all the time."

She continued by explaining that she and her mom created cooking videos together to promote healthy eating, and show that preparing and earing nutritional meals can be delicious and fun.

Robertson's mom, Kia, runs the business "Today I Ate A Rainbow," which encourages children to make healthy food choices, and instructs parents how to prepare wholesome meals and snack for their family.

Hannah went on to say, "If parents haven't taught their kids about healthy eating, then the kids probably believe that junk food is good for them because it might taste good."

She concluded by bluntly addressing the issue, asking Thompson how he felt knowing that the lack of nutritional value in McDonald's fast food products leads to diabetes and obesity in children.

Thompson replied, "First off, we don't sell junk food, Hannah."

He added, "We sell a lot of fruits and veggies at McDonald's and are trying to sell more. He also references that while McDonald's offers burgers, fries and chicken nuggets, the fast food chain also offers apples and fat-free milk in their "Happy Meal," and also offers salads, and grilled chicken wraps, on their regular menu.


10 Most Absurd Lies Told By McDonald's CEO

Last week at McDonald’s annual shareholder’s meeting, CEO Don Thompson got caught off-guard when a team of 15 advocates, led by Corporate Accountability International , descended upon corporate headquarters to question the fast food leader’s relentless exploitation of children and communities of color.

Leading the way was Tanya Fields, executive director of the BLK ProjeK and mother of four. In her dramatic statement , Fields described her neighborhood in the Bronx as a “food swamp filled with corner stores and fast food,” noting that with three outlets within walking distance of her home, “McDonald’s happens to be the biggest alligator in that swamp.” She concluded: “Sorry, but four apple slices in plastic packaging won’t cut it.”

McDonald’s CEO Don Thompson’s response was to ignore Fields altogether and instead give the usual cheerleading speech about all the great things his company was doing. Then he took questions, and the fun really began.

Here are the top 10 lies told by Don Thompson during the Q&A session:

In response to 9-year-old Hannah Robertson (read her statement ):

1) “First off, we don’t sell junk food, Hannah.”

Where to even begin? A quick look at the menu belies that statement, while this “ big breakfast ” item packs more than 1,000 calories: half a day’s worth.

Thompson tried this spin more than once:

2) “We sell lots of fruits and veggies at McDonald’s and we sell side salads for a dollar on the dollar menu.”

In 2011, McDonald’s made a big deal about how it would automatically include apple slices in Happy Meals. Considering that McDonald’s is now the single largest purchaser of apples in the nation, that may qualify as “lots of fruit.” Then again, the company is also the single largest purchaser of both beef (a billion pounds a year) and potatoes . I suppose Thompson would count fries as a vegetable?

While it’s true McDonald’s sells a side salad on its dollar menu (one of 13 items), if you only have a one dollar to spend , what’s the likelihood you would choose a small salad over the 310-calorie “grilled onion cheddar burger”?

3) Claiming “chicken nugget Happy Meals and fat-free milk” are healthy.

According to the McDonald’s website , Chicken McNuggets contain roughly 30 ingredients, including: sodium phosphates, sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, monocalcium phosphate and calcium lactate.

The “fat-free milk” Thompson touted numerous times is actually chocolate milk, containing 10 grams of added sugar, which as registered dietitian Andy Bellatti told me, is more than 75 percent of a day's worth for children ages 4-8 (per the American Heart Association’s guidelines ). He added: “As it is, American children are consuming an exorbitant amount of sugar no one should be encouraging sugary beverages simply because they contain calcium and vitamin D.”

Next, in response to a question from Corporate Accountability International about how McDonald’s is getting kicked out of hospitals over obvious concerns about the conflicting messages, Thompson claimed:

4) “Many hospitals have asked us to come back in or to never leave.”

Thompson must be forgetting about how the CEO of Truman Medical Center in Kansas City kicked McDonald’s out just last year, citing an “inconsistent message.” Perhaps Thompson was also unaware of at least three other hospitals that had ended their contracts with McDonald’s prior to Truman: Lurie Children’s Hospital (formerly Chicago Memorial Hospital), Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Vanderbilt Medical Center and Parkland Health & Hospital System.

Also, Thompson must have missed this memo: more than 3,000 health professionals and institutions from around the world have signed a letter urging McDonald's to stop marketing junk food to children.

Continuing the healthcare theme was a powerful statement by pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Andrew Bremer, who called out the CEO for the company’s marketing to children: “Last year you said, and I quote: ‘Do me the honor… of not associating us with doing something that is damaging to children.’ Well with all due respect, Mr. Thompson, your corporation is doing just that.”

In his response, Thompson seemed to be getting a little desperate, sidestepping the issue of marketing to children altogether, claiming:

5) “We provide high-quality food, we always have. It’s real beef, it’s real chicken, it’s real tomatoes, real lettuce, real fruit, real smoothies, real dairy, real eggs.”

Really? The “real eggs” in an Egg McMuffin are “ prepared with ” the following:

Liquid Margarine: Liquid Soybean Oil and Hydrogenated Cottonseed and Soybean Oils, Water, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Soy Lecithin, Mono and Diglycerides, Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate (Preservatives), Artificial Flavor, Citric Acid, Vitamin A Palmitate, Beta Carotene (Color).

Even the “real smoothies” contain unpronounceable additives. See for example, the “fruit base” of the McCafe Mango Pineapple Smoothie, which consists of :

Water, Clarified Demineralized Pineapple Juice Concentrate, Mango Puree Concentrate, Pineapple Juice Concentrate, Orange Juice Concentrate, Pineapple Puree, Passion Fruit Juice, Apple Juice Concentrate, Natural (Botanical Source) and Artificial Flavors, Contains less than 1% of the following: Peach Puree, Cellulose Powder, Pear Juice Concentrate, Xanthan Gum, Peach Juice Concentrate, Pectin, Citric Acid, Colored with Fruit and Vegetable Juice and Turmeric Extract, Ascorbic Acid (Preservative).

But wait, there’s more. The Mango Pineapple Smoothie also contains “low fat smoothie yogurt,” consisting of: “Cultured Grade A Reduced Fat Milk, Sugar, Whey Protein Concentrate, Fructose, Corn Starch, Modified Food Starch, Gelatin, Active Yogurt Cultures.” And did I mention the 47 grams of sugar? But I am sure it’s “real sugar,” right Mr. Thompson?

Next, continuing to pound Thompson on marketing to kids was Kia Robertson (parent of Hannah see Kia’s statement here ). Then the CEO trotted out the tired industry defense on exploiting children:

6) Globally, we follow guidelines on responsible marketing to children.

Parents in Brazil would beg to differ. Just last month, McDonald’s was fined $1.6 million by the consumer protection agency in Sao Paolo for violating local laws on targeting children.

Here in the U.S., McDonald’s is far from responsible. A report from Yale University found that McDonald’s targets children as young as age 2 at Ronald.com . (This site now redirects to HappyMeal.com , where children are forewarned at the top of the page: “Hey kids, this is advertising!”)

The Yale report also found: “Although McDonald's pledged to improve food marketing to children, they increased their volume of TV advertising from 2007 to 2009.” Preschoolers saw 21 percent more McDonald's ads and older children viewed 26 percent more ads in 2009 compared to 2007. So much for guidelines.

Then Thompson actually said these words:

7) “And we are not marketing food to kids.”

8) To further this point, he claimed “We are not marketing in schools.”

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, see here , here , and here for Ronald McDonald visits to schools. Corporate Accountability International’s report contains more examples of school sightings of McDonald’s clown ambassador. The company likes to claim, as CEO Thompson did, that Ronald is “just a clown” and that he doesn’t actually hawk food per se, never mind the branding.

McDonald’s also promotes “ McTeacher’s Nights ” in which, as the company describes it: “Educators, students, parents, and friends are invited to their local McDonald’s to ‘work’ and raise money for a designated school related cause.” Free labor plus free PR for McDonald’s, how brilliant is that?

In more defensiveness, (you almost had to feel sorry for him) CEO Thompson next tried this line:

9) We are not the cause of obesity.

Did he not see "Supersize Me"?

OK, McDonald’s is obviously not the only cause of our nation’s health woes, but research has shown a connection between the location of fast-food outlets and adverse health outcomes in communities.

For example, one study found that nearly one-third of U.S. children ages 4 to 19 eat fast food, which increases the risk of obesity due to an increase in daily calories. Another study showed that students with fast-food outlets near their schools were more likely to be overweight, and to consume more soda and fewer fruits and vegetables. And this connection was stronger for African-American children, while a third study found a similar pattern among low-income African-American adults. Speaking of which…

In response to Michelle Dyer (see her statement here ), who challenged Thompson on McDonald’s marketing to communities of color, the African-American CEO began by joking, “this hits kind of close to home, wonder why that is?” Then he got very defensive, claiming:

10) “We do not, have not, will not, try to target people of color… I’ve been here 23 years. I know we don’t do that and we wouldn’t do that. We don’t do that under my leadership.”

These three McDonald’s websites speak for themselves:

According to this Bloomberg article , in 2011 McDonald’s CEO’s salary topped $8.75 million. For that kind of money, Don Thompson should have far better talking points at the ready. Let’s see what happens next year.

Meanwhile, you can take Corporate Accountability International’s action to tell CEO Don Thompson to stop marketing to children here .


McDonald's

Last month, McDonald's USA President Mike Andres outlined improvements the company is working on, including the simplification of ingredient labels. Without providing details, he said to expect some changes in early 2015. The remarks came after the company reported a 4.6 percent decline in U.S. sales for November, capping two years of struggling performance.

"Why do we need to have preservatives in our food?" Andres asked, noting McDonald's restaurants go through supplies quickly. "We probably don't."


Beyond Organic has merged with Youngevity… It’s time for answers.

If you’ve bought Jordan Rubin’s awesome products in the past or want to find out more about Beyond Organic, you must read about the recent merger Beyond Organic has made Youngevity.

Get the TOP 8 Questions about the Beyond Organic – Youngevity Merger answered in this easy-to-understand information page. (just click the image)


Little girl scolds McDonald's CEO

Nine-year-old Hannah Robertson gave McDonald's CEO Don Thompson quite the grilling at the company's shareholder meeting this week.

Accusing the fast food giant of 'tricking' kids into eating junk food, Robertson lambasted the taken-aback CEO, who was forced to defend his companies offerings.

"Something that I don't think is fair is when big companies try to trick kids into eating food that isn't good for them by using toys and cartoon characters," Robertson read from a prepared statement.

"If parents haven't taught their kids about healthy eating then the kids probably believe that junk food is good for them because it might taste good.

"Mr. Thompson, don't you want kids to be healthy so they can live a long and happy life?"

Thompson rebutted the girl's claims, saying, "first off, we don't sell junk food.

"My kids also eat McDonald's," he went on to say.

"When they were about your size, to my son who is with us today, who was a little bit bigger, he was a football player, and also they cook with me at home. I love to cook. We cook a lot of fruits and veggies at home."

Thompson elaborated on several measures the company had taken to improve the nutritional content of its offerings, such as introducing affordable salads and non-fat milk products.

On a blog written by Hannah and her mother, Today I Ate a Rainbow, Kia Robertson said the pair's trip was not about "making parents feel bad about feeding their kids McDonald’s food".

"We are asking that they stop going after our kids so that parents can raise and feed their children without having to deal with the Pester Power that companies like McDonald’s love to encourage," she said.

Most commenters on the blog praised Hannah's stance, with one saying, "it takes guts to face down one of the world’s biggest corporations. Don’t listen to detractors. You two are doing the real work and this message is so important."

A commenter identified as Patrick was not so glowing, however, saying: "I’m all about your message but it's obvious you coached your child on exactly what to say to the CEO of McDonalds.

"This tactic of using children to garner emotional capital for your cause is no different than McDonalds’ advertising tactics. Shame on you."



Comments:

  1. Kagakazahn

    I completely agree with you, I have come to this opinion a long time ago.

  2. Addis

    not new,

  3. Yoel

    What an entertaining question

  4. Kazraktilar

    Of course, I apologize, but could you please describe in a little more detail.

  5. Shaktijar

    Bravo, what phrase..., a magnificent idea

  6. Whitlock

    Unable to write: disc is full (R) over, (F) format, (Z) won # 911?



Write a message