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Warm bacon, beetroot and pea salad recipe

Warm bacon, beetroot and pea salad recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Salad
  • Vegetable salad
  • Pea salad

Warm salads are all the rage, and this gorgeous and unusual warm salad complements the sweetness of beetroots and peas with salty bacon, savoury feta cheese and the leafy crunch of red Swiss chard. Beautiful melding of flavours and textures.

42 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 3 beetroots, peeled and cut into 5mm cubes
  • 6 rashers bacon
  • 1 bunch red Swiss chard - leaves chopped and stems discarded
  • 150g fresh or frozen peas
  • 110g crumbled feta cheese

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:40min ›Ready in:50min

  1. Place the beetroots into a saucepan with enough water to cover by 2.5cm; bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until the beetroots are easily pierced with a fork, about 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the bacon in a large, deep frying pan over medium-high heat until evenly browned, about 10 minutes; transfer the bacon to a kitchen paper-lined plate to drain, reserving the bacon fat in the frying pan. Roughly chop the bacon and set aside.
  3. Add the drained beetroots and red Swiss chard to the reserved bacon drippings; cover the frying pan, place over medium heat, and cook until the chard is tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir the chopped bacon and peas into the beetroot mixture; continue cooking until the peas are cooked through, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle the feta cheese over the mixture; stir and serve hot.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(46)

Reviews in English (36)

by sweetpea710

This was A-MAZING! My husband and I bought some beets at the farmers market on Saturday and I had absolutely no idea what to do with them. The directions were incredibly easy to follow, which I was very thankful for. We made a few changes to the recipe: instead of the Swiss chard we used kale (because it's what we had) and we topped the salad with an over medium egg. It was so good! Seriously.So.Good. I was so excited about it that I totally forgot to add the feta, but I think it would just add more flavor. Thanks for posting this recipe! We already have plans to make it again next week!-17 Jan 2011

by VIVNIDHI

I used veggie bacon strips. Fresh grown chard and home pickled beets. The beets were not soft and tasted great in this recipe. Thanks for an innovative one! I'd sneak in garlic next time cause I love chard with garlic. Oh! I forgot the cheese.....-20 Sep 2010

by Ms. E

Delicious! After being a little over zealous at the farmers market and ending up with both beets and swiss chard (plus more) I was looking for something to use both. This recipe was perfect. I ended up using goat cheese instead of feta because I had some already. Really good!-03 Aug 2010


Beetroot & Kale Salad

As late Autumn and then Winter kicks in, it’s rare you’ll find a cold salad on my dinner plate. I just don’t find them very appealing at this time of year.

But a warm salad with sweet roasted earthy beetroot, dark leaves, toasted nuts, and a tangy dressing? Now you’re talking.

BEETROOT & KALE SALAD

Although a Beetroot & Kale Salad may sound drearily worthy, my version really isn’t.

With a great balance of flavours, textures, and colours, no two mouthfuls are the same.

Roasting cooked beetroot enhances its natural sweetness, balancing its earthy notes. For added interest, I toss the wedges with a little crushed fennel seed before roasting in olive oil.

If you can get hold of different coloured beetroots, then this will give your salad maximum eye appeal. Here I used regular dark red beetroots alongside some beautiful organic golden ones from my Moorland Veg Box .

For the leafy element of the salad, you can use any type of kale. But, again, mixing in different varieties and colours will make it so much more interesting.

Here we have another wonderful product from my fortnightly veg box: dramatically dark purple kale.

For the salad in this post I paired it with some contrasting dark green cavolo nero (sometimes called Tuscan kale) from my garden.

Because this is a warm salad, I also pop the kale in the oven for a bit. Not so that it goes completely crispy, just limp with a few crispy edges.

To prepare it, I simply tear the kale into rough pieces, discarding the tough stems as I go.

Curly kale, whether green or purple, will take longer to cook than the finer leafed cavolo nero, so should go in the oven a few minutes earlier.

The other vegetables in the salad, shredded carrots (I use a julienne peeler) and a red onion, are treated similarly: seasoned and tossed with a little olive oil before going in the oven.

Crunch in the Beetroot & Kale Salad comes in the form of nuts. I like pecans or walnuts, but you can substitute whatever you like or have in your cupboard. Whichever you use, I think it’s worth taking an extra few minutes to toast the nuts in a dry frying pan first.

I like to add a handful of cooked grains to the salad and bulgur wheat is one of my favourites. I love its nutty flavour and you don’t even need to boil it. Just soak in hot water and set aside until soft then drain it.

Instead of bulgur, you could use cooked brown rice or quinoa. For convenience, cook in advance, drain, and cool it. When you’re ready to build the salad, just ping in the microwave until hot.

ORANGE & MAPLE DRESSING

What brings together all the lovely goodies in this salad is the fab dressing.

As well as extra virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar, there’s orange zest, orange juice, parsley, and a good helping of garlic.

These sharp and zingy elements are softened by the sweetness of maple syrup. You could use another sweetener if you prefer, but I think maple syrup’s distinctive flavour goes wonderfully well with the pecan nuts as well as earthy beetroots and kale.

To make the dressing, just put all the ingredients in a jar, screw on the lid, and give it all a good shake.

Good as it is, I think this dressing is even better slightly warm. Before tossing it through the salad, ping in the microwave until just warm, not hot. And make sure the lid is off, of course! You could also warm it in a small saucepan on top of the stove.

FINAL TOUCH

While you could eat Beetroot & Kale Salad, with all its wonderful flavours, textures, and colours, just as it is, I love it with halloumi.

I fry squares of the squeaky cheese in olive oil until just golden. I toss the salad with most of the dressing, top with the fried halloumi, then drizzle with the rest of the dressing.

A great alternative to halloumi would be crispy roasted chickpeas which are good for adding protein to plant-based meals. See my recipe for roasted aubergine with herbed tahini yogurt for how to make them.

Best enjoyed as soon as its dressed, this warm Beetroot & Kale Salad will brighten up any Autumn or Winter dinner time.


Best halloumi recipes

Our best halloumi cheese recipes make the most of its unique, squeaky texture to create veggie burgers, vibrant salads and meat-free entertaining dishes. Plus: a quick guide to cooking halloumi properly

Published: October 10, 2018 at 5:07 pm

Make the most of wonderful, squeaky halloumi cheese with our ultimate recipe collection. Our favourite halloumi recipes include grilled halloumi, halloumi salads, halloumi dinner party starter ideas ( check out our vegetarian entertaining recipes here ), and how to make a brilliant vegetarian burger with halloumi.

Just remember to check your halloumi if you’re serving it as a vegetarian option. Some halloumi is set with rennet so look for a vegetarian make, there are lots of good ones available.

First thing’s first, though: how do you cook perfect halloumi?

The simplest way to cook halloumi is to just fry slices in a dry non-stick frying pan. You don’t need any oil and in fact dry-frying helps create a lovely golden crust on the outside of the cheese whilst the inside will be soft and squishy and ready to add to a salad.

Halloumi is also great baked – add slices to an ovenproof dish and drizzle with olive oil and herbs or spices. It’ll need about 10-15 minutes in a 200C/fan 180C/gas 6 oven. The halloumi soaks up the flavours whilst baking so it’s an easy way to add extra welly to your dishes.

How to grill halloumi

Halloumi can stand up to a BBQ really well. It’s best to rub the outside of the halloumi with some oil and to cook it quickly over a very hot direct heat to prevent it sticking to the bars. Try adding some seasoning before you grill for extra oomph.

Here’s our epic halloumi recipe for halloumi fries


Salad Recipes

Starting this salad recipe thread thanks to @Toffee1 and our chat about more interesting salad recipes to jazz up veg. All this salads can be amended with your choice of protein or carbs, and any ingredients not to your taste can be omitted or substituted. I’ll add a few recipes as and when I have time, but do feel free to add your favourite salad recipes too. It would be nice to have a resource to look at for inspiration and variety.

This is a simple light salad I like for lunch. I have it with sourdough bread and hummus, but you can have what suits you. Having berries in a salad sounds a bit strange, but the mix of fruitiness, lemon and pepperiness from the rocket and basil goes well. Multiply up the quantities as needed. This serves One:


Italian Lemon and Basil Salad - Serves 1

Approx 40g of rocket leaves, rinsed
Half an avocado
2 tablespoons of cooked chickpeas from a tin
2 large strawberries, sliced
1 tablespoon of blueberries
6 or 8 walnut halves
Half a lemon
Extra virgin olive oil

4-8 basil leaves
Salt and black pepper

Arrange the rocket leaves spread out flat on a plate. Slice the avocado and put the slices over the salad. Sprinkle the chickpeas over the salad. Add the strawberry slices, the blueberries, and the walnuts, arranging them on top of the salad. Tear up the basil leaves and sprinkle over. Squeeze over the juice from the lemon half, drizzle over 2 or 3 teaspoons of the olive oil, and add salt and pepper. If you prefer, you can make the lemon, oil, salt and pepper into a dressing separately and then pour it over the salad, but I’m lazy and like to save on washing up so don’t. (You can also use frozen chopped basil if you don’t want to buy fresh leaves. Just sprinkle a couple of teaspoons over.)

Chaoticcar

Well-Known Member

EllsBells

Well-Known Member

Lunch salad today -
mixed leaves, 1 large tomato diced, cucumber, 1/4 orange pepper, 2 spring onions, 3 purple radishes, 6 walnut halves, 80g bacon lardons and some fried mushrooms. Drizzled with balsamic vinegar.
Served with 30g camembert and a large spoon of coleslaw.

tbh that could easily feed 2, it was a good bowl full!

Martin.A

Well-Known Member

Tea tonight will be salad with a smoked salmon & spinach omelette.
2 large eggs, 50g smoked salmon, 40g spinach, Italian-style salad (to which I add peppers, cucumber and grated carrot). 75g coleslaw on the side. Carbs in single figures, mostly in the coleslaw.

I sometimes have the same salad mix with Hunter's Chicken (chicken breast fillet, rasher of bacon, grated or sliced cheese and BBQ sauce), which is under 20g carb, mostly in the BBQ sauce and coleslaw.

Alternatively Southern Fried chicken fillet & salad, another that's under 20g carb.

EllsBells

Well-Known Member

My mum's epic salad (feeds 4 as accompaniment):

iceberg lettuce
watercress or spinach leaves or any leaves of your choice
sliced tomatoes
cucumber
mixed peppers
sliced granny smith's apple
segmented orange (peel and cut segments out)
2 sliced (and then halved) peeled kiwis

balsamic vinegar/olive oil dressing.

Leadinglights

Well-Known Member

My mum's epic salad (feeds 4 as accompaniment):

iceberg lettuce
watercress or spinach leaves or any leaves of your choice
sliced tomatoes
cucumber
mixed peppers
sliced granny smith's apple
segmented orange (peel and cut segments out)
2 sliced (and then halved) peeled kiwis

balsamic vinegar/olive oil dressing.

What the.

Well-Known Member

EllsBells

Well-Known Member

What the.

Well-Known Member

Jacinta (Australian)

Well-Known Member

Drummer

Well-Known Member

Peely66

Well-Known Member

Last 2 nights I've tried something I've never done before and just had a salad for evening meal. Usually I'd have carbs in some form either with it or after it like a baked potato or pasta.

I had rocket leaves and then put cherry tomatoes, cucumber, peppers and some salty olives in a bowl and virgin olive oil and apple cider vinegar mix up and add to rocket. add boiled eggs and smoked mackerel (classic combo).

It felt so weird not having carbs I had to have some after the first night so had peanut butter on toast.

Just trying to work out what to bolus with such a low/non carb meal and no PPS. post prandial spike.

Generally feel like I need to be less carb heavy in the evenings.

Pattidevans

Well-Known Member

I love pea shoots. a bag of those and a bag of rocket go a long way. or use watercress. I combine the leaves with still warm cubes of roasted butternut squash, roasted beetroot with fennel seeds cut into wedges (if you can't be bothered to use raw beetroot buy one of those cheap vac packs that are not in vinegar and roast for a short while with the fennel seeds) and add some pecan nuts (even better caramellised but that does add some carbs). Top with cucumber cut into ribbons, some pomegranate seeds and a squirt or two of balsamic glaze. Basically you can add any roasted veg such as peppers.

Or, I make a leafy salad, add cold cooked salmon, warm minted new potatoes, warm green beans and peas.

Lucy Honeychurch

Well-Known Member

Pattidevans

Well-Known Member

Nonethewiser

Well-Known Member

Toffee1

Member

Starting this salad recipe thread thanks to @Toffee1 and our chat about more interesting salad recipes to jazz up veg. All this salads can be amended with your choice of protein or carbs, and any ingredients not to your taste can be omitted or substituted. I’ll add a few recipes as and when I have time, but do feel free to add your favourite salad recipes too. It would be nice to have a resource to look at for inspiration and variety.

This is a simple light salad I like for lunch. I have it with sourdough bread and hummus, but you can have what suits you. Having berries in a salad sounds a bit strange, but the mix of fruitiness, lemon and pepperiness from the rocket and basil goes well. Multiply up the quantities as needed. This serves One:


Italian Lemon and Basil Salad - Serves 1

Approx 40g of rocket leaves, rinsed
Half an avocado
2 tablespoons of cooked chickpeas from a tin
2 large strawberries, sliced
1 tablespoon of blueberries
6 or 8 walnut halves
Half a lemon
Extra virgin olive oil

4-8 basil leaves
Salt and black pepper

Arrange the rocket leaves spread out flat on a plate. Slice the avocado and put the slices over the salad. Sprinkle the chickpeas over the salad. Add the strawberry slices, the blueberries, and the walnuts, arranging them on top of the salad. Tear up the basil leaves and sprinkle over. Squeeze over the juice from the lemon half, drizzle over 2 or 3 teaspoons of the olive oil, and add salt and pepper. If you prefer, you can make the lemon, oil, salt and pepper into a dressing separately and then pour it over the salad, but I’m lazy and like to save on washing up so don’t. (You can also use frozen chopped basil if you don’t want to buy fresh leaves. Just sprinkle a couple of teaspoons over.)


17 Bean Salad Recipes for Summer

The advantages of bean salads are many—they're nutritious, economical, and easy to prepare, and they'll keep well in the refrigerator for days. The primary downside is that they're usually boring. Even the phrase "bean salad" doesn't feel particularly inspirational you don't generally expect it to be followed up with "Yay!" or "Can't wait for that bean salad!"

But to make a bean salad that's both practical and crave-able is easier than you might think. Cook your beans well, prioritize setting up contrasts in texture and flavor, and, whatever you do, don't skimp on the vinaigrette! Beans readily soak up liquid, so they often require more (and more intensely flavored) dressing.

Ready to get cooking? Keep scrolling for 17 bean salads that you'll truly look forward to eating, including a smoky chickpea salad with bacon and Cotija, a simple pairing of plump cranberry beans and tender poached salmon, and a few seasonally suitable salads using crunchy fresh green beans.


I love autumn and winter greens. I can’t wait for Brussels sprouts to come into season. I tend to have odds and sods leftover of greens from other recipes so this dish uses them up perfectly. You can put any greens that you have knocking about into this recipe. It is so comforting to eat…

So tempeh has been around for years but it’s really just made it to the uk chain store market in the last few years it has more texture than tofu and it really soaks up the marinade. I had a grapefruit leftover from a fruit salad and thought I would make a dressing like the…


Recipe: Salmon with peas, beetroot and bacon

We are fortunate in the Fuss Free household that neither of us has any food allergies we do have our preferences and there are things that we would prefer not to eat – raw onion and celery both being near the top of the list – but these are dislikes and are trivial when compared to real food allergies where eating the wrong thing can make you very ill or even in the worse case kill you.

I am acutely aware of allergies – one of my friends is allergic to nuts and thus I am very careful when cooking, and to minimise cross contamination I’ll try not to use any nuts in the kitchen for a day or so before she comes over. I would never attempt to cook for someone with coeliac disease – we bake bread several times a week and however carefully we clean the kitchen I could not be confident that a speck of gluten containing flour would not get into their food.

Whenever I need to cook for someone with an allergy I somewhat paradoxically focus on the ingredient I should not be using so much I create an entire meal around it to be served at another time. If I know someone is allergic to, say mushrooms, I immediately conjurer up a dish of home made pasta flavoured with dried mushrooms, served with a creamy wild mushroom sauce and topped with truffle shavings. Certainly a delicious idea for another occasion.

The quarterly Eating Smart magazine from Woman & Home aims to show that eating Free From food need not be boring and can taste amazing. The current issue is brimming with 101 sumptuous gluten and dairy free recipes that can be ready to eat in less than 30 minutes.

What struck me with the magazine was how it focussed on what you can eat – as opposed to what you cannot – which is a very positive way to think about food allergies. I know I’d far rather be eating a delicious kipper hash, or apple soaked porridge for my breakfast rather than the usual toast.

The magazine covers all your meals and occasions, light lunches, to show case entertaining. Meals at home or on the go as well as tasty low calorie meals. I am feeling very tempted by the show stopper cake on the cover, not only gluten and dairy free but also vegan!

It was a hard task to pick a recipe to make from the magazine, I was torn between a Asian belly of pork with stir-fried vegetables from Mary Berry, or gammon steaks with mustard, or tikka masala mackerel skewers. In the end I handed the magazine to Ed to choose and he picked the pan-fired salmon with crispy fried bacon and peas, which not only was incredibly simple to make (only using one pan to minimise washing up), it was delicious, filling and satisfying. (We slightly adapted the recipe and used double the peas and beetroot)

Tried this recipe? If you try this recipe please tag #FussFreeFlavours on Instagram or Twitter. It is amazing for me when for me when you make one of my recipes and I really do love to see them. You can also share it on my Facebook page. Please pin this recipe to Pinterest too! Thanks for reading Fuss Free Flavours!


Pea Salad

This fun, simple salad is great for any spring or summer gathering.

A favorite from childhood! Pea salad with big chunks of cheese and bits of bacon. Tasty!

frozen green peas, almost totally thawed

slices bacon, cooked until crisp and chopped

small red onion, halved and sliced very thin

cheddar or American cheese, cut into small cubes

  1. Mix the sour cream, mayonnaise, salt, pepper, and vinegar together to make the dressing. Add more salt and pepper to taste.
  2. Stir 2/3 of the dressing into the peas until the peas are coated. Gently stir in the bacon, onion, cheese, and parsley until all combined. Taste and adjust seasonings. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 2 to 4 hours before serving. (Pop the extra dressing in the fridge, too.)
  3. Remove from the fridge and stir in the rest of the dressing to your liking. Sprinkle with more parsley before serving.

First things first: It&rsquos Easter week, so here is my entire Easter Recipe Archive if you&rsquod like to start planning your weekend cooking.

Growing up, my family would go to Sunday brunch a few times a year, and I still remember going through the buffet line and loading up on&hellipwell, everything. From ham to eggs benedict to waffles to mashed potatoes to fruit salad to desserts, all those Sunday brunch delights will forever be etched in my comfort food memory. A couple of years ago, when my sister and I went to our hometown and had Sunday brunch with our dad, you&rsquod better believe all those same brunchie wonders were still there&hellipand you&rsquod better believe I loaded up just like I did as a child. It was all about the nostalgia, after all!

Oh, and I was really, really hungry.

Despite all the other dishes competing for attention at Sunday brunch, the one I most remember was a delicious pea salad with big chunks of cheese, slivers of red onion, and a light, creamy dressing. I don&rsquot even want to think about how many metric tons of the stuff I must have consumed through the years, but I loved it&hellipand still love it every bit as much today. It&rsquos a fun, simple salad that&rsquos great for any spring or summer gathering, but is particularly nice for Easter since it&rsquos bursting with lovely green peas.

Here&rsquos how I make it! Nothing complicated about it.

Start with peas! Frozen peas are great, and here&rsquos what I do: I let them thaw for just a bit at room temperature, but I don&rsquot let them go all the way. You want them to stay nice and cold and firm so they don&rsquot freak out and get mushy when you mix the salad together.

While the peas are thawing a bit, fry some bacon. I would highly recommend waiting until your husband leaves the house to meet with his father-in-law about an issue with a fence before you do this. Otherwise, the bacon won&rsquot wind up in the pea salad. It will wind up in his mouth.

For supah flavah, slice a red onion (otherwise known as a purple onion) in half and remove the weird core if it&rsquos large like this.

Then slice the onion as thin as you can.

This is way more than I need for the salad, but if I&rsquom going to slice a red onion (otherwise known as a purple onion), I&rsquom going to slice a red onion (otherwise known as a purple onion.) Can I get an amen?

I have no idea what I just said.

One of the defining ingredients in the pea salad I&rsquove always loved are nice chunks of cheese throughout the whole darn thing. Now, I can&rsquot speak with authority on this since I never watched the Sunday brunch chef make the pea salad, but I&rsquom 80% sure the cheese used in that pea salad was American cheese. It just had that unapologetic American cheese quality about it. I should make an anonymous phone call over there someday and pretend I&rsquom taking a survey of country clubs across the nation and ask them what kind of cheese they use in their pea salads.

(And while I&rsquom at it, I&rsquoll ask them if their refrigerator is running&hellip)

(Man, I love prank calling. It&rsquos a shame it&rsquos a fading art form.)


Chelsea’s famous kumara and bacon salad

This recipe is from the salad section in 2017’s bestselling cookbook in NZ, Scrumptious. Seriously, you have to make it. Technically it’s not quite famous at the time I write this – but I know it will be! It’s a salad like no other, a guaranteed hit whether you’re serving it up at home or taking it to a picnic, BBQ or a pot-luck dinner. The textures and flavours are sensational. This is equally good served as a warm or chilled salad.

Prep time – 15 minutes
Cook time – 20 minutes
Serves 6

Ingredients

Oil, for frying
1kg kumara (purple, or a mixture of orange and purple)
250g bacon, chopped (free-range is best)
¾ cup chopped walnuts
½ a red onion, finely sliced
½ cup freshly grated Parmesan
¾ cup cooked peas, cooled
¼ cup good-quality mayonnaise
¼ cup sour cream (or use extra mayo)
¼ cup finely chopped parsley, plus extra to serve
¼ tsp white pepper
¼ tsp black pepper
½ tsp salt
Squeeze of lemon juice

Method

Peel the kumara and chop into 4cm pieces. Add to a large pot of salted water, bring to a simmer and cook until tender – about 10-15 minutes. Drain and allow to cool to warm.

While the kumara is cooking, add some oil and the bacon to a frying pan over a medium heat. Fry for about 15 minutes until crispy. Drain on paper towels and discard the extra oil.

Add the warm kumara to a large bowl with the bacon, walnuts, red onion, mayonnaise, sour cream (or extra mayo), parsley, Parmesan, peas, peppers and salt. Squeeze in the lemon juice and toss gently to combine. Serve garnished with extra parsley, or refrigerate until needed. It’s nice warm or chilled and will last a couple of days in the fridge.

(Tip – I sometimes like to add half an avo if I have one handy, just before serving).


Make it meaty…

To turn potato salad into a more substantial or main meal, try adding some cooked meat to the finished dish. Salty, smoky bacon or cooked pancetta cubes work well in both hot or cold versions, just grill or fry until crisp then chop into chunks and stir through the salad or crumble over the top for a crisp bacon topping. For a no-cook alternative, shred ready-cooked ham or chicken into the salad.



Comments:

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  5. Welburn

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